Hi Ben great science & sound advice. May I share with the group? I’m 42, in australia, have been an alcoholic for 10 yrs. In April 2016 I gave up drinking & started living strictly ketogenic. In 3 months I dropped 25 kilos. I have cheated on weekends but I go through a fast of sorts on Mondays to get back into ketosis by Tues. I work afternoon / evenings so I wake at 10.30am take a pre workout drink with raspberry ketones & a splash of mct oil & all my vitamins as well. I then do weights for an hr then get ready to go to work. I take 2 800ml protein shakes consisting of 20 ml mct & 30grm amino enhanced protein. I work in warehousing so I walk anywhere between 10 km & 5 km a nite. I feel great all the time, thanks largely to your research & advice. If have any thoughts or opinions I’d love hear them.

It is possible that you don’t have as much fat to lose as you think. There are several ways to measure body fat, which will give you an accurate gauge of how much you need to lose. A DEXA Scan is an x-ray that measures bone mineral density and body fat percentage. While it’s most accurate, it’s also expensive. You can also use skinfold calipers at a gym or your doctor’s office to get a body fat percentage estimate. This information gives you a good indication of your body fat stores and how much you have to lose healthfully. The silver lining in this case — the more fat you have, the more you have to lose.
Easy: use about half of the recommended serving of Glycofuse, and instead add one scoop of Catalyte electrolytes, one scoop of Kion Aminos, and one serving of ketones and/or MCT’s in the form of Brain Octane, KetoCaNa or KETO//OS (pick your poison, it’s up to you). While any of these forms of ketones and/or MCT’s works for daily focus and short workouts, I found that for long workouts they aren’t very gut friendly unless you really spread out the dosage (e.g. one serving every three hours), so you’d only really use that stuff in something like, say, an Ironman triathlon or multi-day adventure race.
If you want to try a ketogenic diet, be aware that you'll have to adjust it for your individual metabolism and experiment with the right balance of carbs and calories. While some low-carbohydrate dieters find they are able to break stalls in their weight loss, others find that it is more difficult for them to stay in this state. You may want to consult a registered dietitian to build keto-friendly menus for you that will meet your nutritional needs. Be sure to keep your health care provider informed when you start a new diet, especially if you have ongoing health conditions.

Minerals/Electrolytes: Adopting a ketogenic diet will change the way your body uses (and loses) certain minerals. Not replacing these minerals can lead to symptoms of the “keto flu” such as lightheadedness, headaches, constipation, muscle cramps and fatigue. Refer to this article for tips on how to replace common minerals such as sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium.
×