Maria Emmerich is a wellness expert in nutrition and exercise physiology and the founder of keto-adapted.com.   Maria's success stems from her passion for helping others reach and sustain optimal health through programs and education that works on a personalized level. After struggling with her weight throughout her childhood, she decided to study health and wellness so she could help others who are discouraged by their appearance and do not feel their best mentally. Maria understands the connection between food and how it makes us all feel on the inside and out. Her specialty is brain chemical neurotransmitters and how they are affected by the foods we eat. She is the author of several cookbooks and three nutritional guidebooks, including: Global Bestseller The Ketogenic Cookbook. Other books include: Secrets to a Healthy Metabolism, with foreword by Dr. William Davis, New York Times bestselling author of Wheat Belly, Keto-Adapted which includes a foreword by Dr. Davis and excerpts from Dr. David Perlmutter, author of the New York Times bestseller Grain Brain. Maria’s blog, mariamindbodyhealth.com, includes a unique combination of innovative recipes using alternative ingredients to less-healthy options and easy-to-understand explanations of why these options are better for our health.
Risks to Note Those with kidney issues need to be careful not to increase their protein intake too much, says Lisa Koche, MD, a Tampa, Florida–based senior medical adviser for Kegenix, a company that creates keto meal replacements and other keto-friendly products. People with kidney disease may experience waste buildup in the blood if they have too much protein, according to the National Kidney Foundation. High-protein keto may not be right for you if you’re following the diet for therapeutic reasons. “The reason protein is limited at all [in keto] is because the goal in therapeutic keto is to treat epilepsy and to have high ketone levels,” Spritzler says. “Protein will not kick you out of ketosis if you have a lot, but it will definitely lower the amount of ketones in your blood.” Since slightly more protein shouldn’t affect your body’s ability to stay in ketosis, this version of the diet delivers the same weight loss benefits as standard keto, Spritzler says.
The ketogenic diet is usually initiated in combination with the patient's existing anticonvulsant regimen, though patients may be weaned off anticonvulsants if the diet is successful. There is some evidence of synergistic benefits when the diet is combined with the vagus nerve stimulator or with the drug zonisamide, and that the diet may be less successful in children receiving phenobarbital.[3]
"I have changed my Life Rehabilitation Statement from five year goals, to 90-day goals because my life is changing rapidly and I'm hitting big goals. I still read the statement morning and night, I'm still achieving, I just gave myself the tighter time frame. I am more dialled into my immediate future and am making the most of opportunities that are right here, right now."

Pretty soon, I became scared to eat too much protein for fear that it would turn into sugar via gluconeogenesis. I became scared of fruit and many vegetables. I became scared to eat out for fear of things being cooked in unhealthy oils. I didn’t celebrate my kid’s birthdays with pizza and cake because God forbid I eat that many carbs and get kicked out of ketosis. I became obsessed with tracking my fat intake and trying to get it lower and lower, spending so much time planning my day so I would never go over that 5% carb intake. I started losing energy. I got really, really bloated and couldn’t figure out why.


Eat less often. It’s much easier to eat fewer calories and maintain higher levels of ketosis when you eat less meals. Instead of snacking throughout the day, try getting all of your calories from 2-3 meals every day. You can also try intermittent fasting by restricting all your meals to an 8-hour eating window. This will allow your blood sugar and insulin to drop down to baseline levels so that your body can go into its fasting state and burn body fat for fuel.
This was a great article! Thanks so much for clarifying about the KETO diet. I am a thin woman who cannot really gain weight, even though I eat a pretty well rounded diet. My fiancé mentioned the KETO diet because he wants to lose weight. He also would like us to eat dinner together and eat the same things. The latter was mentioned before the KETO diet came into conversation. I already had misgivings about the KETO diet because I feel like my body needs carbs. I do not eat much meat at all and most of my protein comes from beans and other plant foods. Now, I KNOW that the KETO diet is not for me. I am already concerned with losing muscle mass due to aging and changing biologically through peri-menopause and not exercising as much as I should. I LOVE sweet potatoes and other foods you mentioned and could not see giving them up. Anyway, thanks for the information about your experience!
Frederick F. Samaha, M.D., Nayyar Iqbal, M.D., Prakash Seshadri, M.D., Kathryn L. Chicano, C.R.N.P., Denise A. Daily, R.D., Joyce McGrory, C.R.N.P., Terrence Williams, B.S., Monica Williams, B.S., Edward J. Gracely, Ph.D., and Linda Stern, M.D., “A Low-Carbohydrate as Compared with a Low-Fat Diet in Severe Obesity,” N Engl J Med 2003; 348:2074-2081. http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa022637.
It seems strange that a diet that calls for more fat can raise “good” cholesterol and lower “bad” cholesterol, but ketogenic diets are linked to just that. It may be because the lower levels of insulin that result from these diets can stop your body from making more cholesterol. That means you’re less likely to have high blood pressure, hardened arteries, heart failure, and other heart conditions. 
C12 is about 50+% of coconut oil, and it requires a pit stop in the liver rather than getting immediately converted into energy like the other MCT’s listed above. This is why it is more accurately described as an LCT, not an MCT like marketers claim. It raises cholesterol more than any other fatty acid. It is also commonly cited as having antimicrobial benefits, which is does – except the shorter chain MCT oils are more effective against candida yeast infections, and even gonorrhea and chlamydia.
In the first week, many people report headaches, mental fogginess, dizziness, and aggravation. Most of the time, this is the result of your electrolytes being flushed out, as ketosis has a diuretic effect. Make sure you drink plenty of water and keep your sodium intake up.6One of the fathers of keto, Dr. Phinney, shows that electrolyte levels (especially sodium) can become unbalanced with low carb intake.
I did keto for quite awhile for weight loss reasons. I also had the same experience of being scared of food after being on it long enough. I realized that this way of eating was just not right for me. I mean, it got to the point where I’d sometimes just not eat. At the beginning of this summer, I decided it was best to just watch my calories to lose the rest of my weight (100 lbs gone from keto). Unfortunately, I started having very unwelcome effects of changing my diet to low cal. I started getting shaky, lightheaded, dizzy, nauseous, my vision blacked out, etc. This happened every single time I ate. Turns out that because I cut back so low on my carbs for so long and lost so much weight, my body couldn’t handle the carbs after eating. Thankfully, my doc finally just figured out what was wrong after a good couple of months of suffering. I have reactive hypoglycemia. My body overproduces insulin when I eat. My body essentially crashes.
During the 1920s and 1930s, when the only anticonvulsant drugs were the sedative bromides (discovered 1857) and phenobarbital (1912), the ketogenic diet was widely used and studied. This changed in 1938 when H. Houston Merritt and Tracy Putnam discovered phenytoin (Dilantin), and the focus of research shifted to discovering new drugs. With the introduction of sodium valproate in the 1970s, drugs were available to neurologists that were effective across a broad range of epileptic syndromes and seizure types. The use of the ketogenic diet, by this time restricted to difficult cases such as Lennox–Gastaut syndrome, declined further.[10]
In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the function of the brain is compromised by the buildup of debris (plaques and tangles) inside the neurons. This mainly occurs in the areas of the brain associated with memory, intelligence, judgement, behaviour and language and impairs the ability to complete normal day to day tasks and to interact socially. Whilst the symptoms of AD usually only begin to appear with age, evidence suggests that damage to the brain begins to accumulate years earlier. This includes the buildup of plaques and tangles and a decreased ability to metabolise glucose (brain insulin insensitivity)50. If an individual has Type 2 Diabetes (systemic insulin insensitivity), the risk of AD is tenfold higher51.
Urine strips or sticks: Ketone urine strips indicate ketone quantity on a color-grading scale. Urine tests are affordable and easy to use. However, be wary of inaccurate results. Urine tests only monitor leftover, unused ketones in your body. That’s why the strips will be darker, indicating more ketones, when you’re new to the diet. As you adapt to ketosis, your body uses more ketones, so there will be fewer ketones expelled through your urine. Being well-hydrated can also throw off tests.
After reading the article I shopped around and I noticed there are types of MCT oil that are derived from Palm Oil and are considerably less expensive. (http://prototypenutrition.com/keto8.html ) There is a litany of research that says that Palm Oil is on the same level a High Fructose Corn Syrup when it comes to your body. Is this true for MCT oil made from Palm Oil? Is Coconut derived superior to Palm Oil or a blend of the two?
It’s a common misconception that the keto diet is a high-protein diet – it’s a moderate-protein diet where 20-25 percent of your calories come from protein. While it’s helpful to have a portion of protein at each meal to satiate you, you don’t want to overdo it. Too much protein can actually kick you out of ketosis, says Davoodi, through a process called gluconeogenesis, where your body converts extra protein into sugar. Your body will reach for the glucose first and no longer burn fat for fuel.
Reduced hunger. Many people experience a marked reduction in hunger on a keto diet. This may be caused by an increased ability of the body to be fueled by its fat stores. Many people feel great when they eat just once or twice a day, automatically ending up doing a form of intermittent fasting. This saves both time and money, while also speeding up weight loss.
For someone more interested in health/muscle gain rather than weight loss, should I up the protein and good carb levels a bit? I’m around 10% BF and weigh 220, so I require a higher calorie intake the average. In just a few days striving for a Keto-diet, I’m averaging between 50-60g gross carbs (30g net), 160g protein and 220 fat (8%-22%-70%) DO you think that is a good target or should I try and adjust?
Ketones are produced if you eat minimal carbs and very moderate amounts of protein. On the keto diet, your body is fuelled almost entirely on fat. Your insulin levels drop and fat burning escalates. Optimal ketone levels are beneficial for weight loss, health, and also offer mental and physical performance benefits. You’ll be less hungry and also have a steady supply of energy.
There are many ways in which epilepsy occurs. Examples of pathological physiology include: unusual excitatory connections within the neuronal network of the brain; abnormal neuron structure leading to altered current flow; decreased inhibitory neurotransmitter synthesis; ineffective receptors for inhibitory neurotransmitters; insufficient breakdown of excitatory neurotransmitters leading to excess; immature synapse development; and impaired function of ionic channels.[7]
A high proportion of energy from ketone oxidation is transferred to the electron transport chain at the start (as NADH+), in comparison to the energy from fat, where a high proportion is transferred ‘downstream’ (as FADH). This means that, even though there is a high amount of ‘potential energy’ in a fat molecule, less of this can be transferred to ATP.   
Apparently, Dominic’s research seems to be suggesting the fact that diet-induced ketosis from a high-fat, low-carb intake, especially when combined with the use of nutrition supplements such as powdered ketones or MCT oil, can vastly reduce the need for the brain to use oxygen to burn glucose. This is because the brain can use up to around 75% of its fuel from ketones. So a ketone-fed or a fat-adapted brain can be better equipped to withstand low oxygen availability and potentially support longer breath-hold times. Dominic’s research also shows that in the presence of ketosis, the brain and body are able to resist the potential cell damage of long periods of time with low oxygen, also known as “hypoperfusion”.
“Anecdotally, some people who try keto cycling do find it difficult,” she says. “When you reintroduce carbohydrates back into your diet — and this is more about refined carbs, I’m not talking about eating an apple — you don’t feel very good.” She says some people experience a so-called carb hangover — the body feels kind of bloated and inflamed, and you may develop headaches.

I loved this post, thank you. I tried KETO for 1 day only and I felt terrible. It just wasn’t worth it to me to feel like shit even for one day and I knew I had to study a lot at the time, so I decided that keto is just not for me. But at the same time I felt bad for feeling this way, like something was wrong with me, because I couldn’t even follow a diet, that many people say it’s very easy to follow. And now I just accepted the fact that I love carbs too much to give them up (especially fruit).
Enter the Internet. I tried a bunch of things… ordered this powder and that “organic concoction,” etc… nothing… I’m the cook in the family and my love for food has reared its beautiful head again. So in the spirit of finding a balance and battling my own obsessive issues, I eventually found a tea online that’s touted as a “detox” tea but I wouldn’t really call it that. I would describe it as doing the same thing for my obsessions that, say, chamomile tea does for relaxation. It literally “relaxes” my obsessions an mental “food shackles.” Yes, everything about it feels “salesy,” but I’ve tried literally a ton of these things and this one has had an extremely positive effect on my cravings to the point where I finally feel like I’m in control of my “food brain” again. This is what I’ve been using https://bit.ly/2K9pdUK and I’d love to know your thoughts on it.. Do you think it’s all in my head and that mind over matter is better than anything out there or do you think this is something I should stick with?

​It was my first time ever thinking I could control my destiny and map out my future. I wrote down what I wanted my life to look like in five years. I called it my Lifestyle Rehabilitation Statement and I have read it every morning and night for five years. Having a plan took the stress out of my life and instead of random action, I took purposeful action. I started with subtle nutritional shifts and got under 300 pounds.
Minerals/Electrolytes: Adopting a ketogenic diet will change the way your body uses (and loses) certain minerals. Not replacing these minerals can lead to symptoms of the “keto flu” such as lightheadedness, headaches, constipation, muscle cramps and fatigue. Refer to this article for tips on how to replace common minerals such as sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium.
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