I am curious if someone takes any or too much MCT oil (5-10 tablespoons/day) or Exogenous Ketones will the liver slow/stall or shut off endogenous ketone production as you are providing the ketones exogenously and thereby you may NEED to supplement ketones to maintain ketone levels or you may suffer a short term ketone deficit while the liver adjusts to making them on its own again. A parallel I am thinking of is exogenous testosterone supplementation and the hypothalamus/endocrine system slowing/stopping endogenous testosterone production (seen in bodybuilders).

Day 4: Grabbing lunch out has been successful thus far. Today was some tilapia, zucchini, and yellow squash, and a kale and tofu side salad. I tossed on half an avocado for good fatty measure. Oh, and I notice that I've lost a pound already, which is definitely just water weight—carbs hold water so limiting them is a surefire way to release some fluid in your body—but nonetheless. Weight loss wasn't my objective, but I doubt I'm alone in thinking, "I'll take it!"
The situation for Type II diabetics is different because some insulin production remains and some cells of the body can still respond to insulin. It is worth noting that insulin sensitivity can be different between the different tissues of the body such as liver, adipose tissue and muscle. A small amount of insulin release can help to prevent development of DKA unless the body is totally insulin resistant. Insulin resistance is a term used to indicate that for a given amount of insulin, the cells of the body are less responsive and take up less glucose. This means that blood glucose levels remain higher for longer when insulin resistant Type II diabetics eat a carbohydrate rich meal. Over time, the pancreas secretes more insulin to compensate for reduced insulin sensitivity, which can damage the insulin producing (beta) cells. Furthermore, having high blood glucose can lead to a number of side effects:

That can be a shock to the body. “One of the challenges that many people encounter when they try the ketogenic diet for the first time is the drastic lack of energy that is experienced in the first few days. This is the time when the body is learning to use fat for energy rather than readily available carbs,” says Susan Kieffer, DBA, the department chair for the School of Nursing at Purdue University Global. “You can feel very tired during this time and even a little fuzzy in your thinking.”
Frederick F. Samaha, M.D., Nayyar Iqbal, M.D., Prakash Seshadri, M.D., Kathryn L. Chicano, C.R.N.P., Denise A. Daily, R.D., Joyce McGrory, C.R.N.P., Terrence Williams, B.S., Monica Williams, B.S., Edward J. Gracely, Ph.D., and Linda Stern, M.D., “A Low-Carbohydrate as Compared with a Low-Fat Diet in Severe Obesity,” N Engl J Med 2003; 348:2074-2081. http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa022637.
Under normal functioning, leptin enters the bloodstream via your circulatory system and then binds to protein in the blood. When it reaches your brain capillaries, it travels across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), binding to leptin receptors on the hypothalamus portion of your brain. Leptin then clues your brain into the fact that you’re full.[4][5]
Beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) – Not technically a ketone but a molecule. Its essential role in the ketogenic diet makes it count as the important ketone body. BHB is synthesized by your liver from acetoacetate. BHB is important because it can freely float throughout your body in your blood, crossing many tissues where other molecules can’t. It enters the mitochondria and gets turned into ATP (adenosine triphosphate), the energy currency of your cells. BHB = ATP = energy!
×